Friday, December 16, 2011

Journal #40

After today's reading...

* Choose a part of the book that you find particularly interesting or well done

* Quote from it

* Explain why you chose it

100 words minimum

turning in journals #21-40

1. Review your work.
Mark one entry with a star or a sticky note. Above the entry or on the note, write why you chose it / what you want me to respond to.

2. Evaluate yourself.
Beneath the most recent entry (i.e., #40) rate yourself out of 10 in the following three categories. Have an average score for all your entries.

1. Depth / Detail ______ out of 10
(i.e., how fully you answered the question / wrote to the prompt)

2. Completeness ______ out of 10
(i.e., how many of the entries you finished)

3. Clarity _____ out of 10

I will assess your journals largely based on depth/detail and completeness.

Monday, December 12, 2011

capsule reviews of The Odyssey

What are the strengths and weaknesses of this version of The Odyssey?

Write a review in one paragraph on a 4x6 notecard. (Use the lined side.)

You can focus on:

  • Faithfulness to the original story
  • Script / Dialogue
  • Acting
  • Music / sound effects
  • Camerawork (cinematography)
  • Special Effects

agendas, Dec. 12-16

Monday, 12/12
Goals:
* To better understand The Odyssey
* To become sharper observers of cinema

Tasks:
1. The Odyssey: The Movie (excerpted)
2. Capsule Reviews

Journals are due this week.

Have you finished your Odyssey essay?

Mr. A. was out sick Tuesday - Thursday

Tuesday, 12/13
Book 12 of The Odyssey (as read by Sir Ian McKellen)
Visual Notes

Wednesday, 12/14
Reading Day
Journal #40

Thursday, 12/15
Book 13 of The Odyssey (as read by Sir Ian McKellen)
Putting the story of Odysseus in chronological order


Friday 12/16
Goals:
* To write for an authentic audience

Tasks:
1. Checking in
2. Preparing journals to be turned in
3. Turning in journals
4. Blogging!

Odyssey in-class writing task

The assignment is at this link.

Time: 45 mins to 1.5 hrs.

Friday, December 9, 2011

Journal #39

Notes--the highlights from today's reading (book 10, "The Bewitching Queen of Aeaea").

Journal #38

After today's reading time (30 min), write a letter to the author of your story, asking questions or making comments on situations, characters, etc.

If your letter is short, write another one--a response from the author!

100 words minimum (in total)

Journal #37

Notes on today's presentations (summarizing books 1-7 of The Odyssey).

* Major plot points
* Important characters
* Concepts / words
* Mr. A fills in the gaps

Thursday, December 8, 2011

agendas, Dec. 5-9

Monday, 12/5
Goals:
* To understand the plotline of The Odyssey
* To work well in groups when given a task with parameters
* To have fun


Tasks:
1. Instructions
2. Forming groups
3. Preparation
4. Performance
5. Reflection: Journal #37


Tuesday, 12/6
Goals:
* To understand the plotline of The Odyssey
* To comprehend through visualization

Tasks:
1. Finishing from yesterday / recap
2. Book 8 summary
3. Book 9, as read by Gandalf
4. Visual Notes


Wednesday, 12/7
Goals:
* To read for focus and comprehension

Tasks:
1. Reading Time (30 min)
2. Journal #38
3. Reading Records


Thursday, 12/8
Goals:
* To understand the plotline of The Odyssey
* To comprehend through questioning

Tasks:
1. Book 10: "The Bewitching Queen of Aeaea"
a. Whole class
b. Small groups (until 2:32)
c. Journal #39 (on the board)

Read all the way to the end of Book 10 (p. 248)--if you don't finish, you'll need to check out a book.

Tomorrow: in-class writing task based on the book.


Friday, 12/9
Goals:
* To demonstrate our understanding of The Odyssey
* To write clearly and persuasively
* To use textual details to support a thesis

Tasks:
1. Odyssey in-class writing task

Today's assessment is open book--you may use your journal, your visual notes, and The Odyssey!

If you work all the way through the period, but don't finish, you can finish this weekend.

Hold on to your visual notes - they'll go in your folder!

Friday, December 2, 2011

Journal #36

How are you?

* Academic focus
* Any other relevant information
* Whatever's on your mind

Start your piece, "Dear Mr. Anderson," and go from there.

1/2 page or more

Thursday, December 1, 2011

task list and survey, 12/1/11

Complete the tasks listed below, and then fill out this survey. Verify with Mr. Anderson.

folder update: 12/1/11

1. The Waking
2. Future Self drawing
3. "To learn best..." reading assessment
4. "Einstein the Nobody" reading assessment
5. Ability / Effort survey
6. Reading survey
7. Second feedback practice essay
8. Alchemist packet (essays, feedback principles, practice feedback)
9. Expressive reading rubric
10. Open House letter
11. Reflective drawing
12. Speech practice notecard
13. Vocal Quality / Fluency rubric 
14. Nonverbal Communication rubric
15. Book Cover
16. Practice Debate Notes (4x6 card)
17. Debate Ballot
18. Debate Self-Evaluation
19. Hero's Journey practice (4x6 card)


Improvement Checklist
On the right, inside your folder, list things you need to work on. Minimum of TWO in each category, six total.

Three headings:
Reading
Writing
Speaking

Use your own brain, and look at the feedback you've given / received, especially from the debate project, and from your reading spreadsheet.

BE SPECIFIC!

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Journal #35

Make a personal connection to Book One of The Odyssey. Who is the Athena in your life—a person who inspires you, who gives you motivation to move on? Or, who are the suitors—the people who are dragging you down? Explain in a solid paragraph.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

reading The Odyssey

Introduction to The Odyssey
In the next few weeks, we’ll read sections of The Odyssey, the classic tale named after Odysseus, “The Man of Twists and Turns,” a fighter with a quick mind, sharp instincts, and an island-sized ego.

The story begins 20 years after the end of the Trojan War. Odysseus, one of its greatest heroes, is trapped on an island by the powerful sorceress Circe, unable to return home to Ithaca. Back at home, his palace is overrun by greedy suitors. They seek to marry his presumable widow, the regal and cunning Penelope. Telemachus, Odysseus’ son, who was born just before his father left for war, has grown fed up with the suitors, but isn’t sure what to do, as he’s greatly outnumbered.

The story picks up when Athena, the goddess who looks out for Odysseus, asks Zeus for assistance.

Why read The Odyssey?
The Odyssey is one of those stories that everybody is expected to know a little about—the Cyclops, the Sirens, Scylla and Charybdis, the show-stopping “Slaughter in the Hall”—all are part of the collective imagination, and have influenced countless stories since.

Robert Fagles’ translation bring Odysseus’s story to life in powerful, vivid language. Learning to master its rhythms and style is a reward in itself. The story begs to be acted out—so be ready for some drama!

As the poem states, the Muse must “sing for our time too.” Exhorting us to be clever and brave, cunning and ruthless, loyal and true, The Odyssey resonates through the ages.

Monday, November 28, 2011

agendas, Nov. 28 - Dec. 2

Monday, 11/28
Goals:
To understand the stages of the hero's journey

Tasks:
1. Who's a hero? Small groups / sharing out
2. Stages in the hero's journey
3. Journal #34: list the five steps
4. Exit Slip


Tuesday, 11/29
Goals:
* To introduce The Odyssey
* To understand the stages of “The Mundane World” and “The Call to Adventure”

Tasks:
1. Small-group reading (25-30 min)
Out loud, spread throughout the pod, each group will read pp. 77-92, Book 1, “Athena Inspires the Prince.”
2. Small-group question / comment formation (as you read)
3. Whole class discussion / clarification led by the teacher
4. Reflection in Journal #35


Wednesday, 11/30
Goals:
To understand the "call to adventure" in Book One of The Odyssey
To read for focus and fluency

Tasks:
1. Recap / clarification of Book One
2. Reading time
3. Calculating WPM / filling out reading records


Thursday, 12/1
Goals:
To read for comprehension
To track our progress in the class
To set goals

Tasks:
1. In small groups: Book 4 of The Odyssey, pp. 135-151
2. In the lab: updating, goal-setting


Friday, 12/2

Goals:
* To write with detail, for a purpose

Tasks:
1. Journal #36: Check-in
2. "Exit slip" - show journal to / chat with Mr. A.
3. Finish updating spreadsheets / folders

Journal #34

Watch the following video:



Jot down the five basic steps of the hero's journey.

For a more detailed list of steps, which you can incorporate into your basic list of five, view the following video, using examples from The Matrix:

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Journal #33

Play Scrabble for at least a half hour. Use ten of the words from the game to write a story.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Journal #32

Journal #32

We’ve read and discussed an article that describes the controversies surrounding “real-life superheroes” like Phoenix Jones. Now it’s your turn to write.

You have the rest of the period to choose ONE of the following options:

Write a fictional story about a superhero.
Here are some questions to get you started: Who is your superhero? What power(s) do they have (or tools / weapons, if they’re more of a “real-life superhero”)? What’s their weakness? Who or what is their nemesis? Where are they from?

OR

Write an opinion-based piece about a superhero—real or fictional.
Here are some questions to get you started: Who’s your favorite superhero and why? Why are people so interested in superheroes? What do you think of vigilantes like Phoenix Jones? Would you ever consider taking the law into your own hands? Why or why not?

Whichever one you choose, make it interesting, detailed, and insightful. 300-500 words.

agendas, Nov. 21-23

Monday, 11/21 [Mr. A. out sick]

Today’s goals:
• To introduce the guiding question, What makes a hero?
• To enrich understanding through discussion
• To think and write creatively

Today’s tasks:
1. Actively reading the article, jotting down comments / questions (15 min or so)
2. Dividing into small groups (sub with facilitate)
3. Small group discussions (one person is the recorder; 10 min)
4. Written response: Journal #32 (30 min)


Tuesday, 11/22 [Mr. A. out sick]
Today’s goals:
• To introduce the guiding question, What makes a hero?
• To improve writing based on specific feedback
• To publish our work

Today’s tasks:
1. Sharing your hero story / essay with a partner
2. Getting specific written feedback from the partner (15 min)
3. Revising and publishing your story / essay on the class blog (log into www.blogger.com)
4. Reading / commenting on others’ finished work


Wednesday, 11/23
Goals:

To practice working in groups
To build vocabulary
To write creatively

Tasks:
1. Check-in (folders, etc.)
2. Scrabble!
3. Journal #33: Scrabble stories!

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Journal #31

In a solid paragraph, using specific details, describe what you took away from today's reading.

Thursday, November 17, 2011

debate self-evaluation

For the 100 points the debate assignment is worth, I will base your grade on your self-evaluation, as compared with my observations of your participation and effort throughout the process and your casework.

Write a self-evaluation of your role in the debate process, on Google Docs, titled "Firstname Lastname Debate Eval." (Don't forget to share it with me, jvahomework AT gmail DOT com)

Copy these guiding questions into your Google Doc. The document, including questions, will be anywhere from 300-400 words total.

Print the document when you're finished, as it will go in your folder when I've assessed it.


You may use these questions to guide your thinking.

Individual Preparation
How well prepared were you? Why?
Did you spend enough time preparing? Why or why not?
How well did the debate result reflect your preparation?

Group Process
How effective was your group? Why?
Did everyone in the group "pull equal weight?" Why or why not?
If we were to do this again, what might you do differently?


Individual Performance
How did you do? Why?
Did you enjoy the debate? Why or why not?
What do you need to work on?


Judging
Were you able to judge fairly and impartially? Why or why not?
How well did you follow the debate?
How effective were your notes?



Overall, I earned a ______ out of 100 for my role in the debate project

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Journal #30

After the debate, write about how you did, while the memories are fresh in your mind. (Bullet points are fine.)

Journal #29

Things to remember about the debate:

Debaters:
1. ABC: Always Be Confident. You never know--even if you think you're losing, you might be winning!
2. Speak politely, clearly, and loudly.
3. Remember to end by calling for the vote. "For all these reasons, vote [affirmative / negative]."


Judges:
1. Judge independently. Do not confer with other judges.
2. You are not a participant in the debate.
3. On your ballot, provide a constructive comment or two about the speakers' delivery.
4. One judge must keep time and give time signals.
5. Take notes on the back of your ballot.
6. On the ballot, in your Reason For Decision (RFD), don't just write "points were stronger" or "arguments were more logical." Which points, and why?

agendas, Nov. 14-18

Monday, 11/14
Goals:

* prepare for the debate

Tasks:
1. Debate preparation
- Speaking responsibilities
- Judging responsibilities
- Previewing the ballots
2. Journal #29: things to remember
3. Lab Time: printing final drafts of cases
Note: if you wish to print a fresh copy tomorrow or Wednesday, you may--but on your own time!


Tuesday, 11/15
Goals:
* To display our research, critical thinking, and public speaking skills
* To debate!

Tasks:
1. Debating
2. Judging
Journal #30: How did you do?


Wednesday, 11/16
Goals:
* To display our research, critical thinking, and public speaking skills
* To debate!

Tasks:
1. Debating
2. Judging
Journal #30: How did you do?


Thursday, 11/17
Goals:
* To reflect on our learning

Tasks:
1. Debate self-evaluation (printed out and on Google Docs)


Friday, 11/18
Goals:
* To read for focus, fluency, and enjoyment

Tasks:
1. Reading Time
2. Journal #32: reflect on today's reading

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Journal #27

Watch the first 13 minutes of the sample public forum debate.

By the end of the 1st crossfire, who's winning the debate, and why?

Which seems most important in your choice?

Arguments / Evidence?
Style / Delivery?
Something else?

watch a sample public forum debate!


This debate is on the resolution, "Resolved: That, when a choice is required for public high schools in the United States, government funding should prioritize vocational education over college preparatory education."

In your opinion, who wins?

You can also use this link.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Monday, November 7, 2011

Journal #26

Choose one of the questions from the list of debate FAQs. Put yourself in the mind of a teacher, and answer it!

agendas, Nov. 7-10

Monday, 11/7
Goals:
To compile our research and create an effective debate case

Tasks:
1. Journal #26: Frequently Asked Questions - answered!
2. Lab Time
3. Printing a copy of your case
4. Folder updates

Don't forget to share your Google Doc with Mr. A (jvahomework@gmail.com)

Tomorrow, Mr. Sparks' class arrives!

Tuesday, 11/8
Goals:
To receive effective feedback
To improve our cases based on that feedback

Tasks:
1. Quick Check-in
2. Small Groups, working with students from Mr. Sparks' class
3. Reflection / Survey of Feedback


Wednesday, 11/9
Goals:
To understand the structure of the debate
To see crossfire in action

Tasks:
1. Video / Journal #27
2. Discussion
3. Lab Time: improving cases; getting feedback from Mr. A.


Thursday, 11/10

Goals:
To learn rebuttal techniques
To see rebuttal in action

Tasks:
1. Video
2. Journal #28: rebuttal techniques
3. Lab Time: improving cases; preparing "blocks"


Debates begin Tuesday, November 15!

debate - frequently asked questions

Thanks for posting questions to the survey. I've answered them here.

Overall Questions

Why do we have to do this? 
Not only does it help us learn all kinds of important skills and techniques, and promote intellectual growth, but a research project is required in the 9th grade year. I choose to employ a debate format because it is usually more interesting than reading random research papers--the "clash" of debate can be much more fun. Your mileage may vary, but I can guarantee that regardless of how you feel about it, you'll learn a lot.

Why couldn't we do pairs instead of threes?
Because the number of students in the class isn't divisible by 4.  Sorry!

When are the note cards and the debate case due?
The notecards are due Thursday the 10th. (Check in with Mrs. Bonds.)

The debates will take place NEXT WEEK.

Why did we have such a short time period to work on this?
To keep things moving, so we wouldn't have to wait forever until actually debating. Longer deadlines typically result in more wasted time--but don't worry, since we'll have part of this week to finish up.


Are we going to have more debates?
That depends on how well this goes, and whether we decide as a group to have more.  


Case Questions

Does the information we have, have to be in essay format when presenting the case? Can we put it in bullet proof form?
You want it to be all the way written out like an essay, so you have prepared the strongest possible words and don't have to "wing it."  Also, so the students from Mr. Sparks' class will be able to provide better feedback.

May we use quotes from our sources within in our cases? 
Absolutely! Sometimes the direct quote is worded the strongest, with emotionally resonant facts.  Other times, a paraphrase is best. It's your choice.

Do we need to put all of our information and research into the case or are we trying to limit the amount of research we put into the case and save some for the actual debate?
You have only 4 minutes to make your original case, so if you have extra material, that's great--you can save it for the later debate. Also, you can save your defensive arguments as "blocks."

How do you build a strong argument for your contentions?
Choose the best available evidence, and explain what it means and why it's important.  Also, get feedback!  Find out how effective your arguments are by running them past someone else. (We'll do that tomorrow for certain.)

How long should the individual contentions be?
Around 150-200 words, depending on how many you have.

How will we know if we are affirmative or negative?
You should already know which side you're on. We'll check in today.

How many times will the first person speak?
Once or twice, depending on the size of the group.

Why do we need notecards? Shouldn't we just need info on our topic and not have to paraphrase?
The paraphrase has two purposes: first, to show your teacher whether you actually understand the evidence (in some cases, people posted evidence that actually contradicted their point!), and second, in some instances it might actually be better to use the paraphrase rather than the direct quote (especially if the quote is long or confusing).

Friday, November 4, 2011

Debate project check-in survey

Thursday, November 3, 2011

sample debate case: replacing the electoral college

Because we believe in the American people, we affirm today’s resolution, “Direct popular vote should replace electoral vote in presidential elections.”

Contention 1- The Electoral College over represents states with small populations.
Because the number of electoral votes of a state is equal to its number of United States congressmen, and all states have two senators regardless of their population, small states have more representation relative to their population than larger states. For instance, in Wyoming, each electoral vote represents 181,000 people, but in California, each electoral vote represents up to 615,000 people--making the vote of a Wyoming resident over three times more important. The value of a vote should be equal for every individual: one person, one vote.

Contention 2- Electoral College doesn’t focus on individual citizens of the country.

Sub Point A- The winner takes all system incorporated with the Electoral College is unfair.
In the electoral college, if a candidate receives 50.1% of the votes in California, then they get all 55 of those electoral votes. However, in that state, only 0.2% more people voted for that candidate, disregarding and discounting the voices and opinions of the 49.9% of the people. In the direct popular vote, those votes would actually mean something.

Sub Point B- Citizens are discouraged to vote because their vote might not count if their state already leans towards one party.
As a democratic society, it is important for the United States to encourage citizens to have a voice in the democratic process so that more people are satisfied with their government. It is a proven fact that when a voter knows his or her vote makes a difference, they are more encouraged to cast a ballot. According to Fairvote.org, in 2004, the presidential candidates mostly visited the different battleground states such as Michigan, Ohio and Florida and seven others, but basically neglected the other states. According to Nate Silver of the New York Times, “Relative to their number of electoral votes, turnout is about 25 percent higher in swing states than in Democratic or Republican base states.” This shows that because people know that their vote counts, they will vote. Because their votes matter directly, direct popular vote will lead to greater voter participation, resulting in a more effective government.

Contention 3- Elections determined by electoral vote are put in the hands of electors, who are not required to vote the same way as the majority of citizens in their state.
Electoral vote ultimately places the decision of who is elected president in a handful of electors rather than the country’s citizens. Electors are not required to vote fo
r the candidates they pledged to vote for. According to Fairvote.org, there have been over 150 faithless electors in the history of the Electoral College, and “21 states still do not require their members of the Electoral College to vote for their party’s designated candidate” and “the 29 states (including the District of Columbia), that do require faithfulness issue a small variety of rarely enforced punishments for faithless electors, including fines and misdemeanors.” In the 1836 election, Virginia’s 23 electors pledged to vote for Van Buren and his running mate, Richard M. Johnson. However, all 23 of them became faithless electors and did not vote for Johnson. This incident left Johnson one vote short of the 148-vote majority that required for him to get elected. In the end, the Senate had to make the decision of who would become the Vice President. There have been many incidents of faithless electors making an impact on an election and because many states don’t have punishments for this wrongdoing, this practice could continue to break down the legitimacy of the electoral system.

It's time for a change. To give power to the people, vote to replace the electoral college with a direct popular vote. Vote affirmative. Thank you.

the structure of a debate

Pro Case (4 min) -- Speaker 1 from Pro Team
Con Case (4 min) -- Speaker 1 from Con Team
Speaker 1 Crossfire (3 min)

Pro Rebuild / Rebuttal (4 min) -- Speaker 2
Con Rebuild / Rebuttal (4 min) -- Speaker 2
Speaker 2 Crossfire (3 min)

Pro Summary / Rebuild / Rebuttal (2 min) -- Speaker 1 OR 3
Con Summary / Rebuild / Rebuttal (2 min) -- Speaker 1 OR 3

GRAND CROSSFIRE (3 min, all speakers)

Pro Closing (2 min) -- Speaker 2 OR 3
Con Closing (2 min) -- Speaker 2 OR 3

Journal #25

Writing a case
* Time Range: 3-4 minutes (500-700 words)
* Clear organization
* Main points are called contentions
* Evidence / Sources

Responsibilities in the debate
* Presenting the case
* Crossfire
* Rebuttal / Rebuilding
* Taking Notes


QUESTIONS TO ASK

Have we made the strongest overall case for our side?
* How many contentions should we have? (3-5 is ideal)
* What are the strongest possible arguments for our side?
* How fast will we have to read the case to fit the time limit?
* How might we best organize our case for maximum impact?
* Have we anticipated the opposition's arguments? Do we have a separate list of "defensive" arguments, or blocks?
* Have we used the strongest possible words, ideas, and examples to convey our arguments?
* Does our case have emotional resonance?

Dividing up roles: How will everyone on the team participate?
* Who reads the case?
* Who is the second / third speaker?
* How do we match skills / experience with our roles?

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

debate project overview and task list

Check here for daily updates.

We're working on a Debate / Research Project this month, to focus on argumentation, research, and presentation skills.

A packet full of debate information is available for download as a PDF using this link. Enjoy!

1. Day One - 10/24
Library. Introduction to the research process. Creating Essential Question document. Informed about source requirements.

2. Day Two - 10/25
Library. Topics chosen / recorded. Introduction to "BDW" - books, databases, websites. Yellow BDW sheet begun.

3. Day Three - 10/26
Library. BDW work continued. Yellow sheets due Thursday (tomorrow). Introduction to NoodleTools.

4. Day Four - 10/27
Yellow BDW sheets due. Beginning citations and 6 notecards (from various sources) on NoodleTools.

5. Day Five - 10/28
Continuing citations and 6 notecards (from various sources) on NoodleTools. Evidence assessment survey.

6. Day 6 - 11/1
Continuing citations and 6 notecards (from various sources) on NoodleTools. Assessment criteria discussed.

7. Day 7 - 11/2
Citations / notecards due.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

how the notecards and sources are graded

Notecards are due at the end of class Wednesday, 11/2.

Notecards
* 6 Notecards @ 1/2 point each ____ / 3 pts
* 6 paraphrases @ 1 pt each ____ / 6 pts
* 6 "my ideas" tied to your essential question @ 1 pt each ____ / 6 pts

Citations
* Book, website, periodical, database @2.5 pts each ____ / 10 pts
* Correct formatting, proper capitalization and spelling in citations @ 2.5 pts ____ / 2.5 pts
* One citation annotated @ 2.5 pts ____ / 2.5 pts

Total ____ / 30 pts possible

Monday, October 31, 2011

Journal #24

Take notes on the plagiarism video. Bullet points are fine. The two major topics:

1. What exactly is plagiarism?
2. How can I avoid it?

agendas, Oct. 31-Nov. 4

Monday, 10/31
Goals:
To learn about--and how to avoid--plagiarism
To read for enjoyment

Tasks:
1. Plagiarism video
2. Journal #24: Notes on the plagiarism video
3. Reading Time
4. Reading Records

Back to the library on Tuesday!


Tuesday, 11/1
Goals:
To continue the research process
To develop sources for our cases

Tasks:
1. Library Day 6: working on notecards


Wednesday, 11/2
Goals:
To continue the research process
To develop sources for our cases

Tasks:
1. Library Day 7: notecards / citations due. Starting work on debate cases.


Thursday, 11/3
Goals:
To compile our research and create a debate case
To make the best case for our side

Tasks:
1. Journal #25: things to know about your case and your role in the debate
2. Case-writing

Create a Google Doc for your team (just your side!)
Title it like this:

Topic PRO (or CON) Case Name Name Period
Facebook PRO Case Roger Mindy 2nd

Friday, October 28, 2011

evaluating evidence: a survey / preassessment

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

a word about BDW (the yellow sheet)

Expectations / Grading
* Any question that’s italicized / bolded is worth 1 point
* You are individually assessed—look for your own unique sources, especially online. Different websites, articles, etc.
* The goal: to have multiple sources to build your case

Databases
* They’re free! Thanks to school / public library subscriptions, you can access subscriber-only content
* They’re hand-picked, often allowing a higher level of quality in the sources available

The Web
* We’ll use Google, Wikipedia, etc., in more effective ways. Knowing how to “power search” is important. Don’t just click the first link you see.
* Follow the steps to distinguish the various kinds of websites. .edu isn’t the same as .com, for instance.
* Knowing who makes the website is important. Can you trust that source of information? Is it biased? Accurate? Understandable?

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

agendas, Oct. 24-28

Monday, 10/24
Goals:
To prepare our debate resolutions
To learn how to make research questions more specific and useful

Tasks:
1. Folder check
2. Resolution update
3. Library Day 1: Asking Essential Questions; creating first group Google Doc



Note: Scores on Folders
15 - 3 = 15 on task checklist; 3 on improvement checklist
12 - 2 = 12 on task checklist; 2 on improvement checklist
Inc = incomplete



Tuesday, 10/25
Goals:
To familiarize ourselves with library resources
To critically evaluate research sources

Tasks:
1. Library Day 2: intro to BDW


Wednesday, 10/26
Goals:
To familiarize ourselves with library resources
To critically evaluate research sources

Tasks:
1. Library Day 3


Thursday, 10/27
Goals:
To familiarize ourselves with library resources
To critically evaluate research sources

Tasks:
1. Library Day 4: intro to NoodleTools / notecards

Friday, 10/28
Goals:
To successfully evaluate evidence
To prepare for cases

Tasks:
1. Evidence Evaluation exercise / discussion
2. Library Day 5: notecards continued

folder update: 10/24/11

What's in your folder?
Remember, this checklist goes on the left, inside your folder!

1. The Waking
2. Future Self drawing
3. "To learn best..." reading assessment
4. "Einstein the Nobody" reading assessment
5. Ability / Effort survey
6. Reading survey
7. Second feedback practice essay
8. Alchemist packet (essays, feedback principles, practice feedback)
9. Expressive reading rubric
10. Open House letter
11. Reflective drawing
12. Speech practice notecard
13. Vocal Quality / Fluency rubric
14. Nonverbal Communication rubric
15. Book Cover


Improvement Checklist
On the right, inside your folder, list things you need to work on. Minimum of one in each category.

Three headings:
Reading
Writing
Speaking

Use your own brain, and look at the feedback you've given / received, especially from Mr. Anderson in the Alchemist packet, and from the rubrics we used to evaluate other students' speaking skills.

source requirements for the Debate Project

For your debate case, you'll need, AT MINIMUM, 3 varied sources:

1 book source
1 website
1 periodical found via a database

You will create at least 6 notecards on Noodle Tools.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Journal #23

1. Tips for finding a good debate topic
* Familiar (i.e., you know something about it)
* Researchable
* Not too personal
* Not "tired" or overdone

2. 10 (or more) potential debate topics

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

physical characteristics of speaking

Posture / Stance
Does the speaker’s posture suggest confidence? Any problems with rocking or swaying? Does the speaker stand equally on each foot? How wide is the speaker’s stance?


Movement
Does the speaker stand still? If / when needed, does the speaker move from place to place effectively? Is the movement seamless? Is it distracting? Too mechanical or wooden?


Eye Contact
How often does the speaker look at the audience? Does the speaker look up or down, or off to the side, distractingly? Does the speaker focus person-to-person throughout the group?


Facial Expression
Does the speaker smile, frown, etc. when appropriate? What is the speaker's "neutral" expression?


Gestures
Are gestures purposeful, smooth, and appear natural and unforced? Do they complement the content, or are they distracting? Are gestures used too little, enough, or too much?


Unconscious Body Language, Etc.
Leaning forward. Slouching. Furtive glances versus direct gaze. Where hands are / what hands are doing when not in use (In pockets? At side?). Nervous habits--key-jingling, pen-clicking, hand-rubbing, etc.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Journal #22

What are some things you can do to improve your physical / nonverbal communication?

(You may--and should--take notes as Mr. A. provides examples.)

Monday, October 17, 2011

vocal characteristics of speaking

Volume
Is the speaker loud enough to be heard throughout the room? Does the speaker vary volume for effect, for instance, quieter when saying something "extra important?"


Pitch (i.e., how high or low)
Is the normal pitch low, medium, or high? Does the pitch vary (high-to-low) or is it monotonous? Does the variance match the content and emphasis? Does the voice have “musicality?”


Tone
How does the voice sound? Rich? Sonorous? Pinched? Nasal? Throaty? Airy or breathy? Raspy or growly?


Rate / Enunciation
Are all words distinguishable? Is the rate too fast? Too slow? Does it vary for emphasis? Any effective pauses? Any awkward pauses?


Fluency
Do words and phrases flow together? Are rhetorical structures employed? Any problematic or overused “filler” words—“um,” “uh,” “like,” “y’know,” “and,” etc.?

Journal #21

1. Describe your voice. Consider vocal characteristics:
* Volume
* Pitch / Tone
* Rate / Enunciation
* Fluency

2. Tips to immediately improve your speaking voice, including...

Hydrate
Your vocal cords need water. Just plain water is best.

Record yourself
Listen to your own voice--you sound different, not like you think you do!

Practice enunciation
Use the "pen drill." Use Skittles or M&Ms. Open your mouth wider when talking. Do tongue twisters.

Sing!
Take singing lessons. One of your voice's best features is its musicality.

Imitate
View YouTube videos. Imitate interesting accents and styles.

agendas, Oct. 17-21

Monday, 10/17
Goals:
* To practice public speaking in a low-pressure environment
* To practice giving good feedback

Tasks:
1. Checking in
2. Listening
3. Writing - Journal #21
4. Speaking
5. Reflecting - as time permits


Tuesday, 10/18

Goals:
To organize materials
To practice public speaking in a low-pressure environment
To practice giving good feedback

Tasks:
1. A special guest: Mr. Wheeler talks about his philosophy of "failing all the way to success."
2. Listening + Notetaking (Journal #22)
3. Speaking (practicing nonverbal communication)
4. Reflecting
5. Organizing


Wednesday, 10/19
Goals:
To read for focus and fluency
To organize and reflect

Tasks:
1. Reading Time!
2. Reading Records / WPM
3. Folder Organization / Skills Check-in


Thursday, 10/20

Goals:
To learn about debate
To demonstrate our existing rebuttal skills
To form debate groups

Tasks:
1. Sample rebuttal
2. Discussion
3. Intro to Debate Project
4. Forming teams / groups
5. Journal #23

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

when you turn in journals...

1. Review your work.
Mark one entry with a star or a sticky note. Above the entry or on the note, write why you chose it / what you want me to respond to.

2. Evaluate yourself.
Beneath the most recent entry (i.e., #20) rate yourself out of 10 in the following three categories. Have an average score for all your entries.

1. Depth / Detail ______ out of 10
(i.e., how fully you answered the question / wrote to the prompt)

2. Completeness ______ out of 10
(i.e., how many of the entries you finished)

3. Clarity _____ out of 10

I will assess your journals largely based on depth/detail and completeness.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

making a book cover

Goals:
To prepare you for discussion
To focus your thoughts on your book

Tasks:
Fold a piece of paper in half "hamburger style." This will be your book cover.

1. Front cover illustration
* This should somehow reflect the importance of the book to you


2. "Back matter"
* Notes about the book for discussion--bullet points are great!


Coloring is optional. Make it look neat.

agendas, Oct. 10-14

Monday, 10/10
Goals:
* To share our writing with others
* To practice giving feedback

Tasks:

1. Publish your work on the blog!
2. Reflective survey

Tuesday, 10/11
Goals:
To practice effective discussions
To reflect on our work
To complete unfinished tasks

Tasks:
0. Announcements
1. Preparation for group discussion: the book cover!
2. Group discussion
3. Lab time (reflection; catching up)


Are your journal entries #1-20 ready?


Wednesday, 10/12
Goals:
To prepare our journals
To reflect on our writing and other experiences in this class

Tasks:
1. Looking at data
2. Journal Preparation
3. Library Card update
4. Etc.
5. Counseling Center / Career Center visit

Remember, tomorrow is Reading Day!


Thursday, 10/13
Goals:
To read for enjoyment

Tasks:
1. Reading Time (35-40 min)
2. Discussion / Sharing


Friday, 10/14

Goals:
To organize materials
To practice public speaking in a low-pressure environment
To practice giving good feedback

Tasks:
1. "This I Believe"
2. This YOU believe: a public speaking exercise
3. Reflection
4. Evaluating Seniors' work
5. Reflection

group discussion survey

Monday, October 10, 2011

250 words task reflection / survey

publish!

Publish your work!

1. Open Google Docs. Open your 250 word essay. (If you're not finished, finish! If you don't have the instructions, get them on the homework blog!)

2. Share your 400-ish word essay with a peer. Have that peer read your essay and offer any important feedback. The goal is to prepare it for publication.

3. When finished, keep your document open, and, using a new tab or window, sign into the class blog.

4. Choose 100-150 words from your 400-word essay. Copy and paste them onto a new blog post here.

5. Label your post with your first and last name. Also, add the label "250 words." (It should appear once you start typing "250" in the label box.)

6. Publish your post! (Don't forget to spell-check!)

7. When you have successfully published your post, read and comment constructively on at least 2 other posts.

8. When you're finished with that, answer the short survey that will be posted to the blog near the end of the period.

Tomorrow we'll be sharing the books that have influenced us!

Friday, October 7, 2011

folder update: 10/7/11

What's in your folder?
Remember, this checklist goes on the left, inside your folder!

1. The Waking
2. Future Self drawing
3. "To learn best..." reading assessment
4. "Einstein the Nobody" reading assessment
5. Ability / Effort survey
6. Reading survey
7. Second feedback practice essay
8. Alchemist packet (essays, feedback principles, practice feedback)
9. Expressive reading rubric
10. Open House letter



On the right, inside your folder, list things you need to work on.

Three headings:
Reading
Writing
Speaking

Use your own brain, and look at the feedback you've given / received, especially from Mr. Anderson in the Alchemist packet.

Journal #20

How did Mr. Anderson acquire his word-fu? (In other words, his vast knowledge of the English language.)

Tell the story.

We'll write for 7 minutes.

(This isn't a freewrite, so go ahead and make corrections / think about what you're doing!)

Journal #19

Freewrite and don't stop.

Don't correct. If you can't think of something, write, "I can't think of something," until you think of something. Then write that.

Don't stop!

(Remember: it's not a race. You don't have to write super-fast.)


WHEN FINISHED:

How did you do this time?
1. How many words? How many words per minute?

2. Did you write all the way through? Rate yourself from 1-10.

3. Briefly explain your rating. Compare your results with last time's. Was there a difference? If so, why? If not, why not?

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Journal #18

Connecting reading and writing is one of the best ways to improve both!

Today's theme: connections!

You might...
* Make a personal connection to your book.
* Connect your book to something we've done / studied in class
* Connect your book to something in the wider world

Criteria:
Be specific. Give an example or two from the book.

A page. 100-200 words, but focus on quality over quantity.

DO NOT merely summarize your book!

250 words: the 3rd and 4th steps

1. Combine your 250-word pieces into one coherent essay.

2. When you've finished this step, see Mr. Anderson for further instructions.

3. Those instructions are...
1. Copy and paste your 500-word essay above your existing essay. (In other words, you'll have two copies in the same document.)

2. WITHOUT LOSING INFORMATION, revise for conciseness, by reducing your essay to 400-420 words.

The goal is "tight" prose.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Journal #17

Use a dictionary to look up the word you had written 250 words about.

What is the etymology of your word?
How does it connect to what you wrote yesterday, if applicable?

Tuesday, October 4, 2011

250 words more

Take ONE SENTENCE from your 250 words.

Write 250 words expounding on / expanding that sentence. Be as specific as you can!


Add it to your existing Google Document. Don't create a new one.

task list and survey, October 4

In order to save paper, today's task list is a Google Docs form. Complete it before you leave today.

Monday, October 3, 2011

more thoughts about writing

1. Forget the five paragraph essay. It's what you write for a teacher. In this class, we write for authentic audiences, for authentic reasons--most emphatically NOT just for the teacher.

2. Write more about less. We don't want 3 short paragraphs about nothing--give us one great paragraph about something.

3. Be yourself. Write in your style, in your voice. Tell us about your life.

Most important, remember: Everything written is a work in progress.

Journal #16

Reflect.

What will you do differently in your own writing? What can you take away from today's lesson?

agendas, Oct. 3-7

Monday, 10/3
Goals:
To demonstrate our feedback skills
To break the "rules" of writing
To write more engagingly

Tasks:
1. Feedback assessment
2. Discussion / reflection
3. Journal #16
4. Lab time

Happy October!


Tuesday, 10/4
Goals:
To understand etymology
To break the "rules" of writing
To write more engagingly

Tasks:
1. Journal #17
2. Handing back essay packets
3. Lab task preview
4. Computer Lab time


Wednesday, 10/5
Goals:
To read for focus and fluency
To connect reading and writing

Tasks:
1. Reading Time
2. Calculating WPM
3. Journal #18: reading response

Are you focused on improvement?


Thursday, 10/6
Goals:
To write fluently
To revise for conciseness and clarity

Tasks:
1. Journal #19
2. Lab time: revising our 250 (+250) pieces


Friday, 10/7
Goals:
To recap and review
To look forward
To write creatively

Tasks:
1. Journal #20
2. Recap / Review
3. Folder checks
4. Stump Mr. Anderson

250 words about one word

1. Go to Google Docs
2. Write 250 words about one word
3. Title it "Firstname Lastname 250 words"
4. Share it with jvahomework AT gmail DOT com
5. Done!

Journal #15

Stump Mr. Anderson!


Your task: to find an English word in the dictionary that you think I won’t know.

Create three fake definitions, or “distractors,” and make a multiple-choice definition for the word.

Practice properly pronouncing the word. If you’re not sure, ask a peer for help.

When you’re ready, raise your hand. I’ll call on you.

If I can’t spell the word, AND if I can’t guess the definition out of four choices, then you’ve fully stumped me.

Your journal entry is the word plus your definitions, just like this:
Example:
Defenestrate (dee FEN uh strayt)
1. To spit on a sidewalk
2. To burn through steel
3. To toss out a window
4. To pine for a lost love
FYI, the correct answer is 3.

Friday, September 30, 2011

Journal #14

Freewrite and don't stop.

Don't correct. If you can't think of something, write, "I can't think of something," until you think of something. Then write that.

Don't stop!

(It's not a race. You don't have to write super-fast.)



When you're done, reflect:

1. How many words did you write?

2. Did you write all the way through? Rate yourself from 1-10.

3. Briefly explain your rating.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Google Docs!

1. Have you received the spreadsheet? Make sure you do that first.

2. Then, publish your own Google Doc. Your choice of writing style / content. 100-200 words. Title it with your first and last name, plus "First Attempt." Like this: Mr. Anderson First Attempt.

3. Then, share your Google Doc with another student. They'll write a comment on it. (They'll do the same.)

4. Last, share your Google Doc with Mr. Anderson: jvahomework@gmail.com

5. That's it! You're now an expert!

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Journal #13

What did you think about reading expressively? Did you get useful feedback from your peer? What might you do differently next time? Why might it be important to read expressively?

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Journal #12

Predict Mr. Anderson's comments on your revised Alchemist essay.

1. One thing to improve (not including spelling / grammar / punctuation)
2. One thing done well
3. Another thing done well

Journal #11

What's your full name? What does it mean? Are you named after someone? What's the story behind your name? Any other stories connected to your name? Do you like or dislike your name?

Answer any or all of these questions!

agendas, Sept. 26-30

Monday, 9/26
Goals:
To build community
To practice writing for an authentic audience
To practice giving feedback / editing / revising

Tasks:
1. Journal #11: What's your name?
2. Names Quiz
3. Previewing today's task
4. Lab time (in D-12)


Tuesday, 9/27
Goals:
To check our understanding
To build community
To finish important tasks
To share our work

Tasks:
1. Letters, Alchemist essay packets out
2. A special announcement
3. Names Quiz (correcting or taking)
4. Sharing essays
5. Journal #12
6. Turning in work
7. Google Docs / Lab Tasks

Tomorrow is Reading Day! Bring a book!


Wednesday, 9/28
Goals:
To read for focus, fluency, and enjoyment
To boost comprehension
To practice shared reading

Tasks:
1. Quick intro
2. Reading time / records
3. Expressive reading
4. Journal #13

Got book?


Thursday, 9/29
Goals:
To publish on Google Docs!


Tasks:
1. Journal #14
2. Introduction to Google Docs
3. Publishing a Google Doc
4. Sharing your Google Doc

Special guests come tomorrow!


Friday, 9/30
Goals:
To hear authentic examples of writing
To practice offering feedback / questions
To broaden vocabulary

Tasks:
1. Brief intro
2. Rearranging desks
3. Special guest presenters
4. Question / feedback time
5. Journal #15: Stump Mr. Anderson

Welcome our guests!

Monday, September 26, 2011

an invitation to CHS's Open House

In a one-page letter (100-200 words or so), invite a family member to tomorrow's Open House.

Include:

* The time
* The location
* The activities / agenda
* The reasons you want them to attend
* Any other important information

How you phrase the letter is up to you.

To find relevant info, sign into Skyward, check your "Message Center," go to "expired" messages, and see the announcement from Mr. Broome!


BEFORE PRINTING, ensure that someone else in the class has given you feedback, especially for conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.). We want this to be a perfect letter.

At the bottom of the letter, provide a space for the family member to respond and sign the letter:

"I can / can't attend the Open House. ___________ "

Return the signed letter tomorrow.

Sunday, September 25, 2011

folder update: 9/23/11

The following assignments should be in your folder, in this order:


1. "The Waking"
2. Future Self drawing
3. "To learn best..." reading assessment
4. "Einstein the Nobody" reading assessment
5. Ability / Effort survey
6. Reading survey

Thursday, September 22, 2011

second homework assignment: revising the Alchemist essay

Using the principles we discussed in class, comment on / mark up your Alchemist essay, and then revise it.

In a packet, you'll turn in...

1. The principles of effective feedback (handed out Thurs)
2. Your practice with the sample paper (completed Thurs)
3. Your original Alchemist essay
4. Your revised Alchemist essay
5. An author's statement explaining and justifying the changes (100-150 words)


Due Tuesday, Sept. 27th

Journal #10

Write about what you can take away from today's lesson. Something you learned. Something you might do differently going forward. Something interesting.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Journal #9

How to Calculate Words Per Minute

1. Calculate the number of pages you read. Be exact--use decimals! (ex: 10.5 pages)

2. Find a "normal" page, and calculate the number of words per "normal" page. (ex: 310 words)

a. Average words per line x # of lines OR
b. Words on half page x 2

3. Multiply these numbers. (ex: 3255)

4. Divide the number by the minutes we read (ex: 21).

5. This number is your WPM--words per minute (ex: 163).

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Mr. A's brief philosophy of writing

Everything written is a work in progress.

Journal #8

Reflect. What did you learn or think about during today's sharing time?

You might focus on...

* The content of the stories

* The group process

* The writing / publishing / sharing process

Monday, September 19, 2011

Journal #7

Are you a techie?

Describe your level of technological proficiency. Computers, smartphones, the Web, blogging, Facebook, Twitter... etc.

agendas, Sept. 19-23

Monday, 9/19
Goals:
To learn about blogging
To become members of the class publishing blog
To demonstrate technological proficiency

Tasks:
1. Journal #7
2. Brief intro to the blog
3. Computer Lab: logging on


Tuesday, 9/20
Goals:
To practice group work
To share our writing with others
To successfully blog

Tasks:
1. Carol Dweck
2. Sharing our essays / interviews
3. Journal #8: reflection
4. Computer Lab: continuing / extending yesterday's work


Wednesday, 9/21
Goals:
To read for focus and enjoyment
To record our fluency
To calculate WPM

Tasks:
1. Reading Time
2. Reading Records
3. Calculating WPM
4. Journal #9: Record the process


Thursday, 9/22

Goals:
To learn the principles of effective feedback
To practice giving good feedback

Tasks:
1. Student Sample
2. How to Give Effective Feedback
3. Practicing: revising our own work
4. Journal #10: Reflection


Friday, 9/23

Goals:
To review material
To learn a reviewing technique
To practice working in groups
To have fun

Tasks:
1. Organizing folders / making a checklist
2. Intro to SuperQuiz!
3. SuperQuiz!

Friday, September 16, 2011

your first homework assignment

Goals:
To extend learning outside the classroom
To enrich our understanding of the Growth Mindset
To practice research and writing

Options:
1. Research a real-life example of the Growth or Fixed Mindset in action

2. Talk to a friend (not in this class) or family member about a related issue / story. Write up the interview.

250-ish words (1 page double-spaced)

Due Tuesday, Sept. 20

Journal #6

After the brief introduction to Carol Dweck's description of The Growth Mindset, write about...

* Where you fall on the spectrum. Do you have a Fixed Mindset or a Growth Mindset, mostly? Or are you somewhere in the middle?

OR

* Share your opinion. Does Dweck's idea make sense to you? Do you disagree with the descriptions of the two basic approaches?

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Journal #5

Journal #4

In a paragraph, describe a time you failed at something, or made a big mistake.

What happened?

Monday, September 12, 2011

agendas, Sept. 12-15

Monday, 9/12
Goals:
To prepare for Reading Day
To learn the plethora of literary / technological offerings available to CHS students

Tasks:
1. Turn in signed rules sheet / name check-in
2. The day's agenda
3. Library intro / orientation
4. Getting a book

Have you turned in your English journal?


Tuesday, 9/13
Goals:
To prepare for the year (pre-assessment)
To learn about the Growth Mindset

Tasks:
1. Pick up your journal; read my response
2. Turn in signed rules sheet
3. Survey
4. Comparison / Discussion
5. Journal #4
6. What We Know

Happy Tacky Tie Tuesday!
Did you collect your journal?
Do you have a book for tomorrow?


Wednesday, 9/14
Goals:
To learn and begin our record-keeping process
To read for focus and fluency
To read for enjoyment

Tasks:
1. Journal #5
2. Brief Reading Fluency Assessment
3. Reading Time
4. Reading Records / Paperwork
5. Reflection

Got Book?


Thursday, 9/15
Goals:
To learn and continue our record-keeping process
To read for focus and fluency
To learn further about the "Growth Mindset"
To become familiar with the dictionary (as time permits)

Tasks:
1. Survey #2: Reading
2. Brief Reading Fluency Assessment: Part II
3. Reflection / Discussion
4. Growth Mindset
5. Journal #6
6. Folders
7. Your First Homework!

Friday, September 9, 2011

Journal #3

Write me a letter! Start your journal "Dear Mr. Anderson," and go from there. You might write about your previous experiences in English classes (what you'd like to see, wouldn't like to see, like to learn, etc.), what's on your mind, ask questions, etc. Anything that will help me get to know you better--and, hopefully, teach you better.

ONe paragraph minimum.

Journal #2

After reading "The Waking," write about...

* Your thoughts about the poem

* Your thoughts about poetry in general--likes, dislikes, etc.

Share your honest opinion.

Journal #1

Part A

As you watch the film clip about the future of transportation, jot down...

* Things they got right

* Things they got wrong


Part B
Look over your list of right/wrong predictions. Think about yesterday's video, and...

* Make a personal connection
* Make your own prediction about the future
* Explain why things didn't turn out the way they hoped
* Share your opinion of the film / something in the film
* Start a story about the future

(Choose one!)

agendas, Sept. 7-9

Wednesday, 9/7
Goals:
To consider the future
To build community
To become familiar with class routines and processes

Tasks:
1. Video + Journal #1: a vision of the future
2. Discussion
3. Your Future Self

FYI...
* Learn everyone's name!
* Use pen, not pencil (pencil smears)
* Do not sit on (or write on) desks
* Keep electronic devices stowed and silent


Thursday, 9/8
Goals:
To consider the future
To build community

Tasks:
1. Journal #1 part B
2. Reflection
3. The Waking
4. Villanelles
5. Journal #2


Friday, 9/9
Goals:
To consider the future
To build community

Tasks:
1. Class expectations / syllabus / rules
2. Quick discussion
3. Journal #3
4. Collecting Journals